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<!--020070306012771-->Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath, Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty, Mark Nagata - 'Beyond Ultraman: Seven Artists Explore The Vinyl Frontier' [Book]
<!--020070306012771-->Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath, Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty, Mark Nagata - 'Beyond Ultraman: Seven Artists Explore The Vinyl Frontier' [Book]
<!--020070306012771-->Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath, Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty, Mark Nagata - 'Beyond Ultraman: Seven Artists Explore The Vinyl Frontier' [Book]
<!--020070306012771-->Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath, Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty, Mark Nagata - 'Beyond Ultraman: Seven Artists Explore The Vinyl Frontier' [Book]

Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath, Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty, Mark Nagata

Beyond Ultraman: Seven Artists Explore The Vinyl Frontier

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"BEYOND ULTRAMAN: Seven Artists Explore the Vinyl Frontier"is an overview of the inspirations and manifestations of the recent vinyl art toy landscape as explored by seven California artists. The full color book illustrates and explains the specific work of Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, David Gonzales, David Horvath and Sun-Min Kim, Brian McCarty and Mark Nagata. Each artist has a connection to forwarding the vinyl toy movement into the mainstream.
While the movement began in Asia, primarily Hong Kong and Japan, California's potent mix of cultural diversity and cutting-edge experimentation has since made it the ultimate fertile ground for artists blazing new paths in an ultra-cool medium. Fifty years ago the words "art" and "vinyl toy" were about as likely to be spoken in the same sentence as "art" and "comic book." The mid-century modern definition of a vinyl toy was basically one thing -- a doll. Plastic injection molding was a boon to post-war toy manufacturing, but it was mostly used for parts. During the late 50s and early 60s vinyl was being used for mass-produced toys, but the term 'vinyl' was only attached to dolls as a selling factor. Mass production and popular culture are considered the bulwarks that separate designed objects from being 'fine art'. As is the case with comic book artists, the measure of time is the final judge of what we ascribe artistic value. The work of the artists who created Krazy Kat and Superman has over time become recognized as art. The very format and medium of the work have established specific artistic expressions (animation and graphic novels). But what happens when artists turn to mass production and popular culture at the outset? The artists in this exhibit are exploring a new form of expression in the vinyl toy. BEYOND THE USUAL EXHIBITION CATALOG, this is the perfect accompaniment to the show itself, running through January 6, 2008 at PMCA in Pasadena. Co-published with the Pasadena Museum of California Art and the Los Angeles Toy, Doll and Amusements Museum. LATDA not only conceived and curated the exhibition, but was given free rein to shoot and design this catalog. It beautifully shows the artists' work, contains bios of all seven artists with essays by Ivan Vartarian and Maria Kwong (curator). Full color throughout its 64 glossy pages. Softbound.